El niño desorganizado

This is another script I used last year before teaching Brandon Brown quiere un perro. I was originally inspired by Martina Bex’s El niño desobediente when I wrote this script, but it ended up being quite different from her version. The students loved it though!

Spanish

  • lleva
  • regresa
  • eres
  • soy

Hay un niño. El niño es muy desorganizado. Su madre siempre está enojada porque es muy desorganizado.

Cada día, la madre del niño va al trabajo. El miércoles, la madre regresa a casa. Ve un calcetín sucio en el refrigerador. La madre está muy enojada cuando ve el calcetín. La madre le dice al niño, “Eres muy desorganizado. ¡Llévatelo a tu dormitorio!” El niño le responde, “No soy desorganizado, Mamá. Soy muy responsable. Lo siento.” Así que el niño recoge el calcetín y lo lleva a su dormitorio.

El jueves la madre regresa a casa de nuevo. Ve un pescado podrido enfrente de la televisión. La madre está muy enojada cuando ve el pescado podrido. La madre le dice al niño, “Eres muy desorganizado. ¡Llévatelo a tu dormitorio!” El niño le responde, “No soy desorganizado, Mamá. Soy muy responsable. Lo siento.” Así que el niño recoge el pescado podrido y lo lleva a su dormitorio.

El viernes, la madre regresa a casa de nuevo. Ve el espagueti en todas las paredes. La madre no está enojada cuando ve el espagueti en las paredes porque está exhausta y no quiere cocinar. La madre le dice al niño, “¡Llévatelo a la mesa!” Así que el niño recoge el espagueti y lo lleva a la mesa. La madre come el espagueti y le dice al niño, “Eres muy responsable y muy buen cocinero.” Los dos comen el espagueti para la cena y están contentos.

English

  • carries/takes
  • returns
  • you are
  • I am

There is a child. The child is very disorganized. His mother is always angry because he is very disorganized.

Every day, the child’s mother goes to work. On Wednesday, the mother returns home. She sees a dirty sock in the refrigerator. The mother is very angry when she sees the sock. The mother tells the child, “You’re very disorganized. Take it to your bedroom!” The child responds, “I’m not disorganized, Mom. I’m very responsible. I’m sorry.” So the child picks up the sock and takes it to his bedroom.

On Thursday, the mother returns home again. She sees a rotten fish in front of the television. The mother is very angry when he sees the rotten fish. The mother tells the child, “You’re very disorganized. Take it to your bedroom!” The child responds, “I’m not disorganized, Mom. I’m very responsible. I’m sorry.” So the child picks up the rotten fish and takes it to his bedroom.

On Friday, the mother returns home. She sees spaghetti all over the walls. The mother is not angry when she sees the spaghetti all over the walls because she is exhausted and does not want to cook. The mother tells the child, “Take it to the table!” So the child picks up the spaghetti and brings it to the table. The mother eats the spaghetti and says to him, “You are very responsible and a very good cook.” The two eat spaghetti for dinner and are very happy.

Grade 5 Plans for 2016-2017

This is my rough outline of what I am hoping to do with my grade 5 students next year. It is very ambitious considering how much time I have with them (1 hour x 4 days in an 8-day rotating schedule), but I am going to attempt it anyways! They start Spanish in grade 4 but come to me not knowing much more than the basics: colours, numbers, etc. I am going to try to start off with five pretty basic stories. These are all Martina Bex stories that I have adapted to fit the structures I need to teach. The first five stories and structures I teach will be as follows:

Then I will read Mira Canion’s new book, El capibara con botas with them. It’s a really easy read and I think they will love it.

After that, we will do a few more stories and end with Carol Gaab’s Brandon Brown quiere un perro. This is my favourite book for younger students and my grade 5 and 6 students that read it this year not only found it very compelling, but also very comprehensible! They did an amazing job with rewrites and retells throughout the novel study and I found they picked up a lot of extra vocabulary that repeated throughout the novel, even if we hadn’t necessarily used them in a story during the year. The second set of stories I teach (also Martina Bex scripts with two of my own) will be as follows: